At the University of Chicago Medicine, our experts are dedicated to improving the lives of women with endometriosis. Whether it's correcting or confirming your diagnosis, relieving your pain, offering a second opinion for treatment, performing optimized surgical techniques or providing fertility treatment, our multidisciplinary team has the experience to support you through the challenges and discomforts of endometriosis.

Frequently Asked Questions about Endometriosis

The endometrium is a layer of tissue that lines the inside of the uterus. When endometrial tissue grows anywhere outside of a woman’s uterus, she has endometriosis.

Endometriosis is thought to affect approximately 10 percent of women of reproductive age. Although it involves tissue — called implants or lesions — that spreads from one organ to others, endometriosis is not a cancerous condition.

Endometriosis symptoms vary from woman to woman, depending on the number, location and size of her lesions. Some women are affected significantly, while others are not symptomatic at all.

In most cases, signs and symptoms may include:

  • Pelvic pain, particularly shortly before, during or right after a period
  • Heavy or abnormal vaginal bleeding during periods
  • Lower back or leg pains (cramps) during periods
  • Significant pain during sex
  • Inability to conceive (infertility)

Endometrial implants can spread to a number of pelvic organs, including the outside of the uterus and on or around the ovaries, fallopian tubes, bladder and intestines. In rare cases, endometrial lesions can grow elsewhere within the body, such as the liver, lungs, large bowel or rectum.

Pain, the most common symptom of endometriosis, can be the result of:

  • Implants causing inflammation, which stimulates nerves and creates a sensitive pain response in the pelvis, often constant around the time of a woman’s menstrual period and increasing during intercourse
  • Scarring between the pelvic organs and tissues
  • Heavy vaginal bleeding, which increases inflammation and irritation around the pelvic organs

In addition to abdominal pain, inflammation in the pelvis may also cause pain in the lower back or pain during sexual intercourse.

Researchers are actively studying potential causes of endometriosis. Currently, there is a strong indication that the body’s genetic make-up may play a significant role in who develops endometriosis. This means your risk may be greater if your mother, aunt or sister has endometriosis.

Portrait of gynecologists Monica Christmas, MD, and Laura Douglass, MD

7 Silent Signs You Could Have Endometriosis

UChicago Medicine gynecologists Monica Christmas, MD, and Laura Douglass, MD, help explain signs and symptoms of endometriosis.

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Physicians, to schedule a patient, contact our women's health team at 773-702-6118 or womenshealth@uchospitals.edu.

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For your convenience and safety, we offer secure and easy virtual visits for many of your gynecologic and obstetric needs. Our care providers can assess your symptoms, make a diagnosis, recommend treatment and send prescriptions to your pharmacy.

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Complete an online questionnaire (e-visit) through your MyChart account to get a same-day diagnosis and a treatment plan for vaginitis (vaginal discharge) or a suspected urinary tract infection (UTI).

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Whether you are facing a complex health issue or difficult treatment decision, getting a second opinion can help you make an informed decision about your care. Get an online second opinion from one of our experts without having to leave home.

Meet Our Endometriosis Physician Team