Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy 

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a highly effective treatment for many psychiatric diagnoses and medical conditions, including depression, anxiety and other mental health problems. 

CBT is short-term, focused and goal-oriented treatment based on collaboration between a patient and therapist. An initial evaluation assesses and measures symptoms, identifies problems and builds a baseline for treatment goals. Through ongoing assessment during the course of treatment, improvement is measured and the treatment plan is modified as necessary. 

Sessions are focused on learning new skills, and patients will be given many "homework assignments" to use these strategies in their daily life. Cognitive-behavioral interventions can include education, self-monitoring, cognitive restructuring, relaxation, exposure, emotion regulation, interpersonal effectiveness and stress management. 

Patient motivation and feedback are important in the success of CBT. While it requires a great deal of effort and hard work, the gains can be extraordinary and the skills are associated with improvement and prevention of relapse.

The CBT program at the University of Chicago Medicine provides assessment, diagnosis and empirically supported treatment for different disorders in adults. Treatment is provided by licensed clinicians and advanced trainees who have specialized training in CBT. If appropriate, referrals for medication are made, and all providers work closely together to coordinate individualized care.

We also offer other forms of psychotherapy, including insight-oriented psychotherapy, trauma therapy and intensive individual therapy.